PAST FELLOWS

2008


Abby Falik :: Global Citizen Year

Abby grew up in a leafy, comfortable California suburb. When she was 16, she spent a summer living in a poor rural community in Nicaragua and the experience transformed her view of the world. Since then she has worked to ensure that many – and more diverse – young Americans can have similar transformative experiences. The idea for Global Citizen Year grew out of her ten years working at the intersection of education and international development.


Freya Spielberg :: Healthbox

Freya is a family physician trained in clinical and public health. After 20 years of researching alternative HIV and STD counseling and testing strategies, she decided to take what worked in the U.S. and apply it in developing countries. She quickly morphed from researcher to social entrepreneur with Healthbox.


Greg Casagrande :: MicroDreams

Armed with a fistful of finance and accounting degrees, Greg was ready to leave a career in the automotive industry and apply his skills in a very different kind of endeavor. He and his family wound up in Samoa where he launched and brought to profitability the first microenterprise organization in the Pacific Islands.


Jane Alderman :: Peter C. Alderman Foundation

After the death of her brother in the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, Jane Alderman co-founded the Peter C. Alderman Foundation with her parents. Armed with a background in business operations, she helped the family determine how to best memorialize her brother -- by helping to heal the emotional wounds of victims of terrorism all over the world.


Jane Chen :: Embrace

After she quit her management consulting job to work on HIV / AIDS issues in China and Africa, Jane saw stunning healthcare disparities firsthand. She got an MBA and Masters in Public Policy, and co-founded Embrace with a team of engineers to create affordable, life-saving products for mass distribution; she also spent time in India launching Embrace's $100 infant incubator.


Tevis Howard :: Komaza

While studying neuroscience in college, Tevis made several trips to Kenya to do malaria research. Seeing extreme rural poverty at length for the first time made him realize that there was something even more fun to tackle than malaria and he switched from science to social entrepreneurship. Now he splits his time between San Francisco and Kenya, where KOMAZA's team develops profitable solutions to serve the hardest-to-reach families living in chronic poverty.