PAST FELLOWS

2015


Angelica Towne :: Educate!

Angelica Towne knows the impact of a nonprofit that bridges opportunity gaps. After her experiences here in the US, she devoted her life to curriculum development for the same type of program, but focused on youth across the globe. She co-founded Educate! and subsequently went to spend seven years in Uganda to fully immerse herself in the development of their courses. She believes that the world has changed, and education should, too.


Carl Jensen :: Good Nature Agro

Carl is a farmer. By getting his hands dirty with farmers around the globe -- from his family's wheat farm in Idaho to the small-scale maize fields of Zambia and many countries in between -- Carl saw that farmers everywhere are asking for the same things: inputs, training, finance, new technologies, and access to fair and transparent markets. After spending time as a teacher in Cambodia, and later with D-Labs of MIT and UC Davis, Carl came to believe that growing human capital is the key to translating short-term change into lasting impact.


Gaya Datar :: EarthEnable

Gaya has worked in international development for 10 years with prominent organizations like Dalberg Global Development Advisors, the World Bank, and the Government of Liberia. She loves getting things done in developing countries using data-driven strategies. It wasn't until her MBA from Stanford that she discovered the importance of the built environment in developing countries. During her time in Stanford's Design for Extreme Affordability class, Gaya and her team designed an earthen floor and proprietary sealing oil that could reduce health issues for families and children, and immediately set off to get it to the places that need it most.


Gwen Floyd :: Soko

Gwen has start four business working across systems design, technology, and social impact over the past 15 years. She started an industrial design business at age 20 before moving into tech and international development and was consistently interacting with the artisan communities. Again and again, she saw an exclusionary and exploitative supply chain make it impossible for artisans to access an increasingly hungry international market. In 2013, she co-founded Soko to overcome the barriers that were effectively keeping artisans locked in the economic insecurity of their local markets.


John Rendel :: PEAS

During university, John took a trip to East Africa and immediately saw the need for low-cost, high-quality secondary schools. He quickly founded the first PEAS school, and quickly immersed himself in the Teach First program and taught secondary-school math for two years in the UK. Once he learned what he could about secondary school systems, he left the classroom in 2006 and dedicated himself to PEAS.


Liisa Petrykowska :: Ignitia

Liisa is an atmospheric physicist that thought it was about time to develop a weather forecast for tropical regions; contrary to popular belief, no working system can reliably predict weather. After studying physics and meteorology in Sweden, she worked as a visiting scientist at the University of Washington, and started Ignitia in 2010.


Nakul Saran :: Fish Forever

Nakul is an ocean engineer committed to implementing sustainable and scalable solutions that help people and nature thrive in coastal communities. Prior to joining Rare, Nakul spent several years at the global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company where he led the Oceans & Fisheries service. Having spent his formative years in Mauritius, and further traveled the globe for work (and pleasure), Nakul has cemented his lifelong commitment to help protect the world’s oceans and all life dependent upon them.


Noam Angrist :: Young 1ove

Noam Angrist is a research-loving and impact-obsessed social entrepreneur. After conducting research at the University of Botswana, he was motivated to address the social challenges he saw every day -- namely sugar daddies and rampant HIV infection. Noam chose to tackle this issue by taking a proven intervention from a five year-old RCT, previously collecting dust on a shelf, and turning it into a scalable intervention.